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come late July and well into August.With the snowy peak just above, the meadows are like a welcome mat to the mountain, as this is also the departure point for climbers chris myers 2xl jersey headed for Camp Muir, the 10,100 foot base camp for many bound for Rainier peak.At 5,100 feet, Paradise is also one of the snowier places on Earth, receiving an average of 53 feet per year, so expect to find snow here until mid July and keep in mind that this is also the park most popular area for winter recreation, attracting snowshoers and snow campers, as well as fun lovers using the park only snowplay area with inner tubes and other sliding toys.Trails in the area: Nisqually Vista Trail, 1.2 mile loop, with Nisqually Glacier views; Alta Vista, 1.6 miles round trip, mountain and wildflowers; Skyline Trail to Myrtle Falls, 1 mile, wheelchair accessible with assistance.Sunrise, at 6,400 feet, is the highest place you can drive to in Mount Rainier National Park. It so high and snowy that the road doesn usually open until around the Fourth of July
travelling in small parties that disperse on arrival in the Arctic (Madge and Burn 1988). The species is gregarious outside of the breeding season, often gathering into large flocks of hundreds or thousands of individuals on the wintering grounds (Madge and Burn 1988, Kear 2005a). The species forages by day (where undisturbed [del Hoyo et al. 1992]) and roosts at night on open water (Kear 2005a). Habitat Breeding The species breeds near shallow pools, lakes (del Hoyo et al. 1992) and broad slow flowing rivers (del Hoyo et al. Potamogeton spp.) connected to coastal delta areas (Kear 2005a) in open, moist, low lying sedge grass or moss lichen (Kear 2005a) Arctic tundra (del Hoyo et al. 1992). It rarely nests in shrub tundra, and generally avoids forested areas (Kear 2005a). Non breeding On migration the species frequents shallow ponds (Kear 2005a), lowland and upland lakes (Madge and Burn 1988, Kear 2005a), reservoirs (Madge and Burn 1988), riverine marshes, shallow saline lagoons (Kear 2005a) and sheltered coastal
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